The Bulletin Board

New Hampshire to receive $26 million in new carbon-reduction program

By: - May 2, 2022 3:10 pm
Cars being charged

The money is meant to help states develop carbon-reduction strategies, which could include initiatives such as expanding transportation options by installing charging stations for electric vehicles. (Sean Gallup | Getty Images)

New Hampshire is set to receive $26 million over five years through a new carbon-reduction program announced by President Joe Biden and the U.S. Department of Transportation in April.

Nationwide, the program includes $6.4 billion in spending and is part of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. It aims to “fund projects that help fight climate change and save Americans money on gas.”

The money is meant to help states develop carbon-reduction strategies, which could include initiatives such as expanding transportation options by installing charging stations for electric vehicles, creating dedicated bus lanes, or building infrastructure to make it easier to bike or walk.

“Eligible projects include on- and off-road trail facilities for pedestrians, bicyclists and other nonmotorized forms of transportation and projects that support the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles,” states the announcement from the U.S. DOT. It will be up to state and local governments to decide which projects to pursue.

But James Penfold, director of e-mobility for ReVision Energy, pointed to the program’s loose requirements that would make it easy for states to switch the funds to other programs. “I interpret that they would like to see it go towards genuine carbon-reduction programs but realize they have to give states flexibility with it,” Penfold said.

A state can transfer up to 50 percent of funds made available through the program per year “to any other apportionment of the State,” according to the program fact sheet.

Another federal program called the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Formula Program is dedicated to creating a national network of fast-charging stations. Penfold said this program could be used to complement those efforts by building what are called Level 2 chargers, which take longer to charge a car’s battery than a fast charger. These chargers could be located at workplaces or public rest areas.

In New Hampshire, transportation is the biggest source of carbon emissions – which are driving climate change. Transportation is also the sector responsible for generating the most emissions across the country.

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Amanda Gokee
Amanda Gokee

Amanda Gokee is the New Hampshire Bulletin’s energy and environment reporter. She previously reported on these issues at VTDigger. Amanda grew up in Vermont and is a graduate of Harvard University. She received her master’s degree in liberal studies, with a concentration in creative writing, from Dartmouth College. Her work has also appeared in the LA Review of Books and the Valley News.

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